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HOME Christopher J. Zarembinski, M.D.



Dr. Zarembinski believes, as any exemplary physician, that patient education is paramount to their comfort, communication, and success. If you, as the patient have an idea of what the problem is, you can better communicate to your physician what your needs are which results in a swifter resolution of your pain. For that reason, Dr. Zarembinski happily shares the following articles with you for your interest. More articles are continually added so please check back often as we hope for this site to become a reliable health resource!


these are articles that don't fall under a specific anatomical heading but are provided for your convenience, interest, and education.

cervical / neck pain Pain located in the neck is a common medical condition. Neck pain can come from a number of disorders and diseases of any tissues in the neck, such as degenerative disc disease, neck strain, whiplash, a herniated disc, or a pinched nerve. Neck pain is also referred to as cervical pain.

lumbar / lower back pain

Most low back pain is triggered by some combination of overuse, muscle strain, and injury to the muscles, ligaments, and discs that support the spine. Many experts believe that over time muscle strain can lead to an overall imbalance in the spinal structure. This leads to a constant tension on the muscles, ligaments, bones, and discs, making the back more prone to injury or reinjury.

The causes of pain in the low back, or lumbosacral region, tend to add on to one another. For example, after straining muscles, you are likely to walk or move in different ways to avoid pain or to use muscles that aren't sore. That can cause you to strain other muscles that don't usually move that way.

thoracic / upper back pain

Upper back pain, also called middle back pain or thoracic pain, is pain that is felt between the bottom of the neck and top of the lumbar spine. The upper spine is very strong and stable to support the weight of the upper body, as well as to anchor the rib cage which provides a cavity to allow the heart and lungs to function and protect them.

The word “thoracic” means pertaining to the chest, and the thoracic spine comprises the upper portion of the spine that corresponds to the chest area. The upper spine includes twelve vertebrae, and each of the upper nine vertebrae in this section attach to the a rib on either side of the spine. Each of the ribs then curves around the side of the body and attaches to the breastbone in front. This forms a sturdy structure (the throracic cage) that supports and protects the internal organs - the heart, lungs and liver.







sources: www.emedicine.net www.webmd.com www.wikipedia.org



Trigeminal Neuralgia

Cervical / Neck Pain Articles

Thoracic / Upper Back Pain Articles

Lumbar / Lower Back Pain Articles



Christopher J. Zarembinski, M.D.


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